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From The Wife of Bath's Prologue, lines 457-474:
The Wife of Bath claims the right to drink
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From The Canterbury Tales:
The Wife of Bath's Prologue
lines 475-486: About youth and aging


475        But, Lord Crist! whan that it remembreth me
Upon my yowthe and on my jolitee,
It tikleth me aboute myn herte roote.
Unto this day it dooth myn herte boote
That I have had my world, as in my tyme.
480But age, allas, that al wole envenyme,
Hath me biraft my beautee and my pith!
Lat go, farewel, the devel go therwith!
The flour is goon, ther is namoore to telle,
The bren as I best kan, now moste I selle;
485But yet to be right myrie wol I fonde.
Now wol I tellen of my fourthe housbonde.
475      But Lord Christ! When I do remember me
Upon my youth and on my jollity,
It tickles me about my heart's deep root.
To this day does my heart sing in salute
That I have had my world in my own time.
480But age, alas! that poisons every prime,
Has taken away my beauty and my pith;
Let go, farewell, the devil go therewith!
The flour is gone, there is no more to tell,
The bran, as best I may, must I now sell;
485But yet to be right merry I'll try, and
Now will I tell you of my fourth husband.




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From The Wife of Bath's Prologue, lines 487-508:
The Wife of Bath's fourth husband
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