Previous Previous:
From The Wife of Bath's Prologue, lines 437-456:
... pleasure
Previous
Librarius Homepage
© Librarius
All rights reserved.



From The Canterbury Tales:
The Wife of Bath's Prologue
lines 457-474: The Wife of Bath claims the right to drink


       Swiche manere wordes hadde we on honde.
Now wol I speken of my fourthe housbonde.
       My fourthe housbonde was a revelour -
460This is to seyn, he hadde a paramour -
And I was yong and ful of ragerye,
Stibourn and strong, and joly as a pye.
Wel koude I daunce to an harpe smale,
And synge, ywis, as any nyghtyngale,
465Whan I had dronke a draughte of sweete wyn.
Metellius, the foule cherl, the swyn,
That with a staf birafte his wyf hire lyf,
For she drank wyn, thogh I hadde been his wyf,
He sholde nat han daunted me fro drynke.
470And after wyn on Venus moste I thynke,
For al so siker as cold engendreth hayl,
A likerous mouth moste han a likerous tayl.
In wommen vinolent is no defence,
This knowen lecchours by experience.
      Such were the words I had at my command.
Now will I tell you of my fourth husband.
       "My fourth husband, he was a reveller,
460That is to say, he kept a paramour;
And young and full of passion then was I,
Stubborn and strong and jolly as a pie.
Well could I dance to tune of harp, nor fail
To sing as well as any nightingale
465When I had drunk a good draught of sweet wine.
Metellius, the foul churl and the swine,
Did with a staff deprive his wife of life
Because she drank wine; had I been his wife
He never should have frightened me from drink;
470For after wine, of Venus must I think:
For just as surely as cold produces hail,
A liquorish mouth must have a lickerish tail.
In drunken women has no means of defence,
This know all lechers by experience.




Next Next:
From The Wife of Bath's Prologue, lines 475-486:
About youth and aging
Next