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From The Wife of Bath's Tale, lines 863-887:
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From The Canterbury Tales:
The Wife of Bath's Tale
lines 888-904: A rape, a penalty, the queen judge


       And so bifel it that this kyng Arthour
Hadde in his hous a lusty bacheler,
890That on a day cam ridynge fro ryver;
And happed that, allone as she was born,
He saugh a mayde walkynge hym biforn,
Of whiche mayde anon, maugree hir heed,
By verray force he rafte hir maydenhed;
895For which oppressioun was swich clamour
And swich pursute unto the kyng Arthour,
That dampned was this knyght for to be deed,
By cours of lawe, and sholde han lost his heed -
Paraventure, swich was the statut tho -
900But that the queene and othere ladyes mo
So longe preyeden the kyng of grace,
Til he his lyf hym graunted in the place,
And yaf hym to the queene al at hir wille,
To chese wheither she wolde hym save or spille.
       And so it happened that this King Arthur
Had at his court a lusty bachelor
890Who, on a day, came riding from river;
And happened that, alone as she was born,
He saw a maiden walking through the corn,
From whom, in spite of all her screams of pity,
Straightway by force he took her virginity;
895For which violation was there such clamour,
And such appealing unto King Arthur,
That soon condemned was this knight to be dead
By course of law, and should have lost his head,
Peradventure, such being the statute then;
900But that the other ladies and the queen
So long prayed of the king to show him grace,
He granted life, at last, in the law's place,
And gave him to the queen, as she should will,
Whether she'd save him, or his blood should spill.




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From The Wife of Bath's Prologue, lines 905-918:
The queen sends the criminal knight on a quest
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