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From The Wife of Bath's Prologue, lines 230-240:
About the art of lying
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From The Canterbury Tales:
The Wife of Bath's Prologue
lines 241-262: The Wife of Bath on how to lecture a husband


       "Sir olde kaynard, is this thyn array?
Why is my neighebores wyf so gay?
She is honoured overal ther she gooth;
I sitte at hoom, I have no thrifty clooth.
245What dostow at my neighebores hous?
Is she so fair? Artow so amorous?
What rowne ye with oure mayde? Benedicite,
Sir olde lecchour, lat thy japes be!
And if I have a gossib or a freend
250Withouten gilt, thou chidest as a feend
If that I walke or pleye unto his hous.
Thou comest hoom as dronken as a mous
And prechest on thy bench, with yvel preef!
Thou seist to me, it is a greet meschief
255To wedde a povre womman, for costage,
And if she be riche and of heigh parage,
Thanne seistow it is a tormentrie
To soffre hire pride and hir malencolie.
And if she be fair, thou verray knave,
260Thou seyst that every holour wol hir have;
She may no while in chastitee abyde
That is assailled upon ech a syde.
       "'Sir Dotard, is it thus you stand today?
Why is my neighbour's wife so fine and gay?
She's honoured over all where'er she goes;
I sit at home, I have no decent clothes.
245What do you do there at my neighbour's house?
Is she so fair? Are you so amorous?
Why whisper to our maid? Benedicite!
Sir Lecher old, let your seductions be!
And if I have a gossip or a friend,
250Innocently, you blame me like a fiend
If I but walk, for company, to his house!
You come home here as drunken as a mouse,
And preach there on your bench, a curse on you!
You tell me it's a great misfortune, too,
255To wed a girl who costs more than she's worth;
And if she's rich and of a higher birth,
You say it's torment to abide her folly
And put up with her pride and melancholy.
And if she be right fair, you utter knave,
260You say that every lecher will her have;
She may no while in chastity abide
That is assailed by all and on each side.




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From The Wife of Bath's Prologue, lines 263-290:
A shrewe's proverb
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