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From The Shipman's Tale, lines 239-254:
The merchant announces a business trip to Flanders
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From The Canterbury Tales:
The Shipman's Tale
lines 255-298: Dan John asks the merchant to lend him secretly hundred franks


255        At after-dyner daun John sobrely
This chapman took apart, and prively
He seyde hym thus: "Cosyn, it standeth so,
That wel I se to Brugges wol ye go.
God and seint Austyn spede yow and gyde!
260I prey yow, cosyn, wisely that ye ryde.
Governeth yow also of youre diete
Atemprely, and namely in this hete.
Bitwix us two nedeth no strange fare;
Farewel, cosyn; God shilde yow fro care!
265And if that any thyng by day or nyght,
If it lye in my power and my myghte,
That ye me wol comande in any wyse,
It shal be doon, right as ye wol devyse.
255        After the dinner Dan John soberly
This merchant took aside, and privately
He said to him, "Cousin, it stands just so,
For I see well that you to Bruges will go.
God and good Saint Augustine speed and guide!
260I pray you, cousin, that you'll wisely ride;
Guard your health well, and govern your diet
Temperately, especially in this heat.
Neither of us requires outlandish fare;
Farewell, dear cousin; God shield you from care.
265If anything there be, by day or night,
If it lie in my power and my might,
That you would have me do, in any wise,
It shall be done, just as you may devise.
       O thyng, er that ye goon, if it may be,
270I wolde prey yow; for to lene me
An hundred frankes, for a wyke or tweye,
For certein beestes that I moste beye,
To stoore with a place that is oures.
God helpe me so, I wolde it were youres!
275I shal nat faille surely of my day,
Nat for a thousand frankes, a mile way.
But lat this thyng be secree, I yow preye,
For yet to-nyght thise beestes moot I beye.
And fare now wel, myn owene cosyn deere;
280Graunt mercy of youre cost and of youre cheere."
       One thing, before you go, if it may be,
270I pray you do, and that is, to lend me
A hundred francs, for but a week or two,
For certain cattle I must buy, to do
The stocking of a little place of ours.
So help me God, I would that it were yours!
275I will not fail you, come next settling day,
Not for a thousand francs, a mile away.
But let this thing be secret, pray, for I,
Even tonight, must go these beasts to buy;
And farewell now, my own good cousin dear.
280And many thanks for entertainment here."
       This noble marchant gentilly anon
Answerde and seyde, "O cosyn myn, daun John,
Now sikerly this is a smal requeste.
My gold is youres, whan that it yow leste,
285And nat oonly my gold, but my chaffare.
Take what yow list, God shilde that ye spare.
       This noble merchant, civilly, anon,
Answered and said: "O cousin mine, Dan John,
Now surely this is but a small request;
My gold is yours and aye at your behest.
285And not gold only, no but all my ware;
Take what you like, God shield that you should spare.
       But o thyng is, ye knowe it wel ynogh,
Of chapmen, that hir moneie is hir plogh.
We may creaunce whil we have a name.
290But goldlees for to be, it is no game.
Paye it agayn whan it lith in youre ese;
After my myght ful fayn wolde I yow plese."
       There's but one thing, which you know well enow
Of traders, for their money is their plow.
We may on credit trade, while we've a name,
290But to be goldless is to lose the game.
Pay it again when you are at your ease;
In all I can, very gladly I will you please."
       Thise hundred frankes he fette forth anon,
And prively he took hem to daun John.
295No wight in al this world wiste of this loone,
Savynge this marchant and daun John allone.
They drynke, and speke, and rome a while and pleye,
Til that daun John rideth to his abbeye.
       These hundred francs he went and got anon,
And privately he gave them to Dan John.
295No one in all the world knew of this loan,
Saving this merchant and Dan John alone.
They drink, and talk, and walk awhile, and play,
Until Dan John sets out for his abbey.




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From The Shipman's Tale, lines 299-306:
The merchant goes to Bruges
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