Previous Previous:
From The Nun's Priest's Tale, lines 81-115:
The widow's yard and its inhabitants
Previous
Librarius Homepage
© Librarius
All rights reserved.



From The Canterbury Tales:
The Nun's Priest's Tale
lines 116-141: Chauntecleer the rooster has a bad dream


       And so bifel, that in the dawenynge,
As Chauntecleer, among hise wyves alle,
Sat on his perche, that was in the halle,
And next hym sat this faire Pertelote,
120This Chauntecleer gan gronen in his throte
As man that in his dreem is drecched soore.
And whan that Pertelote thus herde hym roore
She was agast, and seyde, "Herte deere,
What eyleth yow, to grone in this manere?
125Ye been a verray sleper, fy for shame!"
       And he answerde and seyde thus, "Madame,
I pray yow that ye take it nat agrief.
By God, me thoughte I was in swich meschief
Right now, that yet myn herte is soore afright.
130Now God," quod he, "my swevene recche aright,
And kepe my body out of foul prisoun.
Me mette how that I romed up and doun
Withinne our yeerd, wheer as I saugh a beest
Was lyk an hound, and wolde han maad areest
135Upon my body, and han had me deed.
His colour was bitwixe yelow and reed,
And tipped was his tayl and bothe hise eeris;
With blak, unlyk the remenant of hise heeris;
His snowte smal, with glowynge eyen tweye.
140Yet of his look, for feere almoost I deye!
This caused me my gronyng, doutelees."
       So it happened that, in a bright dawning,
As Chauntecleer 'midst wives and sisters all
Sat on his perch, the which was in the hall,
And next him sat the winsome Pertelote,
120This Chauntecleer he groaned within his throat
Like man that in his dreams is troubled sore.
And when fair Pertelote thus heard him roar,
She was aghast and said: "O sweetheart dear,
What ails you that you groan so? Do you hear?
125You are a sleepy herald. Fie, for shame!"
       And he replied to her thus: "Ah, madame,
I pray you that you take it not in grief:
By God, I dreamed I'd come to such mischief,
Just now, my heart yet jumps with sore affright.
130Now God," cried he, "my vision read aright
And keep my body out of foul prison!
I dreamed, that while I wandered up and down
Within our yard, I saw there a strange beast
Was like a dog, and he'd have made a feast
135Upon my body, and have had me dead.
His colour yellow was and somewhat red;
And tipped his tail was, as were both his ears,
With black, unlike the rest, as it appears;
His snout was small and gleaming was each eye.
140Remembering how he looked, almost I die;
And all this caused my groaning, I confess."




Next Next:
From The Nun's Priest's Tale, lines 142-175:
Pertelote the chicken defies bad dreams and cowardly men
Next